Portfolio

Upcoming Event

Innovators in Biomedical Engineering Speaker Series
"What is Epithelial-Mesenchymal Plasticity and Why is it Important for Metastasis?"

Herbert Levine, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics and Bioengineering at Northeastern University
Friday, May 17, 2019








Hip Stability and Range of Motion: Soft Tissue Role in Total Hip Arthroplasty Versus Femoral Head Resurfacing

Client: Wael Barsoum M.D. / Cleveland Clinic

Services Provided: Experiment Design / Robotic Hip Joint Testing / Data Analysis / Manuscript Preparation

Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a widely successful operation for relieving pain and restoring function. Dislocation is a devastating complication after THA, with a reported incidence as high as 10% following primary surgeries. Femoral head resurfacing (FHR) is an increasingly popular option typically used in a younger population because of its theoretical increased stability and bone preservation of the femur. Dislocation rates have been reported as low as 0.75%. However, much controversy surrounds the resurgence of FHR and its biomechanical implications of retaining the femoral neck, leading to small head-to-neck ratio (HNR) and large jump distance relative to THA. We have developed a dynamic cadaveric robotic model which functions in real time under load-control parameters to recreate in vivo hip mechanics. The objectives of this study were to (1) examine the biomechanical differences between each construct of the native hip, FHR, and THA, and (2) evaluate the role of the soft tissue on the stability and dislocation potential of each construct.