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Upcoming Event

BME GUEST SEMINAR
"The 'Art' of Computational Modeling in Knee Biomechanics"
Ahmet Erdemir, PhD, Cleveland Clinic
Jason Halloran, PhD, Cleveland State University
Carl Imhauser, PhD, Hospital for Special Surgery
Peter Laz, PhD, University of Denver
Kevin Shelburne, PhD, University of Denver
Wednesday, December 13, 2017 

 

Effect of Humeral Head Defect Size on Glenohumeral Stability: A Cadaveric Study of Simulated Hill-Sachs Defects

Client:Scott Kaar M.D. and Steve Fening Ph.D. / Cleveland Clinic

Services Provided: Experiment Design / Robotic Shoulder Joint Testing / Data Analysis / Manuscript Preparation

Hill-Sachs lesions are often present with recurrent shoulder instability and may be a cause of failed Bankart repair. The goal of this study was to determine how large of a lesion is required to reduce stability. Humeral head defects, 1/8, 3/8, 5/8, and 7/8 of the humeral head radius, were created in 8 human cadaveric shoulders, simulating Hill-Sachs defects. Testing positions included 45 degrees and 90 degrees of abduction and 40 degrees of internal rotation, neutral, and 40 degrees of external rotation. Testing occurred at each defect size sequentially from smallest to largest for all abduction and rotation combinations. The humeral head was translated at 0.5 mm/s 45 degrees anteroinferiorly to the horizontal glenoid axis until dislocation. Distance to dislocation, defined as humeral head translation until it began to subluxate, was the primary outcome measure. The study found that glenohumeral stability decreases at a 5/8 radius defect in external rotation and abduction. At 7/8 radius, there was a further decrease in stability at neutral and external rotation.

Publications: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20194958